Is This English?

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918
Dreich - common Scot's vernacular - meaning a drizzly, dark day in - typically, winter - interestingly the Dutch and Germans use the same word - albeit pronounced slightly differently.

Footer - to fanny about - to prevaricate.
Fanckle - something twisted or complex.
Skelp - to smack.
Am'urnae - I am not.
Did ye - aye, right? - looks like a positive comment but isn't.
Messages - groceries.
Dinger - used for a very angry person - he did his dinger.

Bye fur the noo. I

This brings back some memories. Sadly, my Scottish accent and vocabulary is long gone. I do remember using "get oot the road" as a nipper, for "get out the way" and calling street drains, IIRC, "syvers" a word I have never heard since. I also do love the word "squishing"
 

Digimonkey

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This brings back some memories. Sadly, my Scottish accent and vocabulary is long gone. I do remember using "get oot the road" as a nipper, for "get out the way" and calling street drains, IIRC, "syvers" a word I have never heard since. I also do love the word "squishing"
Some more - without definitions this time. :) See how much comes back to you? In a lot of cases - Scot's vernacular words aren't that far from onomatopoeia - the answer might well suggest itself.

glaikit

snider

tumshy

skinny-ma'links

Ruby

the clennie

to be the talk of - the steamie

hairy

black affronted

stoashis

maroculous

Yours - aye - I.
 
OP
Bogeyman

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This brings back some memories. Sadly, my Scottish accent and vocabulary is long gone. I do remember using "get oot the road" as a nipper, for "get out the way" and calling street drains, IIRC, "syvers" a word I have never heard since. I also do love the word "squishing"

Funny, I always thought you were Italian with that screen moniker. :unsure:
 
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137
Location
Manchester
Dreich - common Scot's vernacular - meaning a drizzly, dark day in - typically, winter - interestingly the Dutch and Germans use the same word - albeit pronounced slightly differently.

Footer - to fanny about - to prevaricate.
Fanckle - something twisted or complex.
Skelp - to smack.
Am'urnae - I am not.
Did ye - aye, right? - looks like a positive comment but isn't.
Messages - groceries.
Dinger - used for a very angry person - he did his dinger.

Bye fur the noo. I
I spent some time working in an office in Glasgow and initially, i was able to translate about one word in three with some of the native folk who worked there.

I quickly learnt that "ets awee an gen sum fud" meant "shall we go for lunch, chaps ?" :D:D

Its made worse by the fact that many Glaswegians seem to talk quickly.
 

Boab

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We once had a Colombian student on exchange stay with us who wanted to improve her English. I can't think of a worse place to come to learn English. With me being Scottish as well, she must have thought she got on the wrong plane!
I don't know, if you can live in Scotland and understand people I reckon you could understand English being spoken pretty much anywhere else.
 

jimmyc

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I don't know, if you can live in Scotland and understand people I reckon you could understand English being spoken pretty much anywhere else.
Oh I don't know about that, I'm a fifer and I once had to do deliveries up in Aberdeen area in the early 80s.
I stopped an elderly gent and asked directions, thanked him and went straight to nearest garage I could find and bought a map.
I did not have a clue what he was saying. I think it was doric or chinese or Vietnamese or Spanish or a mix of them all. :cool:.
 
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