Is This English?

Messages
224
Location
North Wales
After perusing this article I felt like I had watched an entire episode of Star Trek..........................spoken in Klingon!!!! :oops: I understood maybe 10% to 15% of these wacky British phrases!! :ROFLMAO:

All perfectly normal. With the exception of Dench. At a conservative estimate, I am 20+ years too old too ever use the word Dench. Along with YOLO, totes, Basic and Fam ;)
 
Messages
252
Don't forget the Cornish, they have their own language too, although not so many people can speak it these days! :)

I was down in Plymouth briefly, a couple of summers ago. When I asked for a "fish supper" I got a blank stare. Then I remembered I wasn't in Scotland any more. "Fish and chips please!".

The harbour area near the citadel is a lovely place to potter about on a summer evening but I couldn't stay for long. Would love to come back sometime to explore the area properly. Great drive back north through Wales & Shropshire as well, avoiding the motorway around Birmingham. Tintern abbey is a much nicer place to take a break v a motorway service station.

The west bits are the best bits :)
 

Blademonkey

Supporter
Supporter
Messages
14,331
Location
Sunny Cornwall
I was down in Plymouth briefly, a couple of summers ago. When I asked for a "fish supper" I got a blank stare. Then I remembered I wasn't in Scotland any more. "Fish and chips please!".

The harbour area near the citadel is a lovely place to potter about on a summer evening but I couldn't stay for long. Would love to come back sometime to explore the area properly. Great drive back north through Wales & Shropshire as well, avoiding the motorway around Birmingham. Tintern abbey is a much nicer place to take a break v a motorway service station.

The west bits are the best bits :)
Plymouth is a lovely part of Devon, I've been there several times but Cornwall is God's own country but I would say that wouldn't I!! :)

Paul.
 

Digimonkey

Supporter
Supporter
Messages
2,331
There are many dense regional dialects. In parts of Scotland:

blether - chat with friends
dreich - dull, grey (weather)
hoachin' - abundant
stramash - messy fight

Traditional Scots is almost a language in its own right.

And then there's Gaellic and Welsh, an entirely separate group of Celtic languages which also includes Irish gaellic.

PS: "Scotch" is not a real word. We drink whisky. A dram. A malt (ie a single malt). A nippy sweetie. The adjective for Scotlandy is "Scottish" and the Scottish people are "Scots". "Scotch" sounds like someone trying to pronounce "Scottish" after too many nippy sweeties. I guess we're stuck with "Scotch whisky industry" now though.
Dreich - common Scot's vernacular - meaning a drizzly, dark day in - typically, winter - interestingly the Dutch and Germans use the same word - albeit pronounced slightly differently.

Footer - to fanny about - to prevaricate.
Fanckle - something twisted or complex.
Skelp - to smack.
Am'urnae - I am not.
Did ye - aye, right? - looks like a positive comment but isn't.
Messages - groceries.
Dinger - used for a very angry person - he did his dinger.

Bye fur the noo. I
 
Messages
10
After perusing this article I felt like I had watched an entire episode of Star Trek..........................spoken in Klingon!!!! :oops: I understood maybe 10% to 15% of these wacky British phrases!! :ROFLMAO:

I have heard of most of these sayings and here in Australia quite a few of them are still used unceremoniously in everyday talk.
 
Top Bottom