Good riddance to DE shaving!

Messages
86
......we most certainly do encourage the attainment of really good technique, which in many respects comes from using less complicated or engineered tools.....

.....when I joined this forum, I was a cartridge shaver and getting some horrible shaves, so much so I practically gave up on shaving.....

.....there's a LOT more to shaving than just the razor.....
Never truer observation & comment made, or lesson learnt!
 
Messages
13
I have a fungal infection due to low immunity, it's not related to shaving. My head, neck, mouth, chest, buttocks, armpits, thighs and the little guy are all effected.

The fungal creams and hydrocortisone are kind of working, depending on area. I am trying hypochlorous acid next

Sounds like candidiasis.

I don't know how your weakened immune system fits in, as you did not get specific.

Some candidiasis, though not this bad, is not unusual with healthy people. But it is especially a problem for someone on drug therapy for HIV or treatment for cancer, for example. Knowledgeable doctors will combine treatment for candidiasis for such conditions, using diet, drugs and/or other supplements. I have been told that sometimes the candida overgrowth can be more life-threatening during chemotherapy than the drugs.

The problem of candida overgrowth became prevalent after the invention of antibiotics in the 1940s, and their widespread use in the 1950s and 1960s. The increased use of antibiotics would seem to correspond with the increase in abnormal obesity that is becoming ever more obvious. Candidiasis from antibiotics may be to blame, along with the excessive consumption of refined carbs, fast food and junk food in recent decades. Look at photos from the 1950s, 1960s and even 1970s: People were not generally overweight. Now a lot of people need electric wheel chair shopping carts in the supermarket, and still load up on ice cream, cookies, pie, etc. Something is very wrong.

An improved diet is fundamental to clearing up candidiasis, removing refined sugar, wheat and other simple carbs that feed the fungus, at least initially.

Dr. C. Orian Truss did much of the original research into candida and wrote the first and best book on the subject: "The Missing Diagnosis." He advocating taking Nystatin internally. He said it was very safe, and did not pass beyond the digestive tract, which is the origin of the infection. Newer antifungals are more systemic, but seem to be safe. The catch is whenever you kill a widespread infection, all that dead stuff leaves toxins that might make you feel bad until your body can remove them.

There are a variety of natural food and herb supplements that have a reputation for effectiveness. Coconut oil is the most well-known, and is certainly easy to add to your diet. However, most people don't understand how it works. About half of coconut oil is lauric acid, which is commonly used to make soap (and may be why applying coconut oil to your face after shaving will make your skin burn). When you eat coconut oil, your body combines some of the lauric acid with glycerin to make monolaurin, which is the component that is believed to be a powerful germicide, including fighting viruses and fungi. If you just apply coconut oil externally, you are not getting any monolaurin. You can buy pure monolaurin, but it is expensive. If you add coconut oil to your diet, you mix it with a little glycerin. Glycerin is in the fat of a lot of foods, but your body has to digest it.

Pau D'arco herb has a long-established reputation for being effective against candidiasis. I intend to try some as part of changes to improve my diet and health, post covid.

Tea tree oil is famous, but is for external use, only. It is in Vi-John tube shave cream, which is the most popular shave cream with barbers in India, and for good reason: Staph infections are a big problem in India. Glycerin, which is fairly expensive, is the main active ingredient. It provides an excellent shave. However, if you use shaving soap, you probably should buy a few synthetic brushes and rotate them so they dry out thoroughly.

Of course, you can buy tea tree essential oil. But do some research: essential oils are extremely concentrated and should be used carefully.

The benefits of a low carb, no sugar diet are due to a variety of factors. Aside from helping to starve/clear up candidiasis, eliminating wheat and dairy can reduce stress on your immune system if you have an IgE food allergy to them. This is due to the "rain barrel effect."

As to shaving, I'm not sure I would use a cartridge razor if I had a skin infection. Would it dry out enough between uses to avoid perpetuating and spreading an infection?

I wouldn't use a butterfly razor, either. I'd just use a three-piece DE razor. If I were really worried, I would just use a blade once, and I would have more than one razor, so it dried out thoroughly: dry air and UV light do a lot to kill germs. And I would use a very mild razor.

I dug out my Baili BR171 razor and attempted to shave with it this morning. In theory, it's a great design, clamping the blade tightly. The blade gap is good. But, like many Chinese razors, there just isn't enough blade extension. Experimenting with angles, I could get a shave with it, but it wasn't close. However, obviously, some folks want such a shave. I gave up on it, and returned to my vintage OC razor. But I'm spoiled.

If you have to be very careful about nicks and cuts, the Baili BR171 might be a good DE razor. The Baili BR172 is even milder. Some people love it - I guess people who want a cheap alternative to mild cartridges. I gave mine away years ago. You probably would want a sharp but gentle blade. The Treet King blade might be worth considering. Or just go with the more common Treet 7 Day Platinum blade. I think you might find it smoother and gentler than the P&G Perma-Sharp blade, and about as sharp. The Treet Dura Sharp carbon steel blade has the merit of not having any chrome in the sputtering or stainless steel -- just a coating of PTFE -- so it is probably about as hypoallergenic is they come.

And then, of course, there is the BIC Sensitive single blade disposable razor. If necessary, just use it once. Don't press too hard and you will be fine. Or the BIC Metal, if it's not too aggressive.

Do some research on your own if you can't find a doctor who you have confidence in. There's a lot you can do.

Hope this helps.

FYI: I Interviewed Dr. Truss while working as an editor and researcher at a well-known health book publisher. He was a very modest, cordial man.
 
Last edited:
Messages
2,699
Location
UK
Sounds like candidiasis.

I don't know how your weakened immune system fits in, as you did not get specific.

Some candidiasis, though not this bad, is not unusual with healthy people. But it is especially a problem for someone on drug therapy for HIV or treatment for cancer, for example. Knowledgeable doctors will combine treatment for candidiasis for such conditions, using diet, drugs and/or other supplements. I have been told that sometimes the candida overgrowth can be more life-threatening during chemotherapy than the drugs.

The problem of candida overgrowth became prevalent after the invention of antibiotics in the 1940s, and their widespread use in the 1950s and 1960s. The increased use of antibiotics would seem to correspond with the increase in abnormal obesity that is becoming ever more obvious. Candidiasis from antibiotics may be to blame, along with the excessive consumption of refined carbs, fast food and junk food in recent decades. Look at photos from the 1950s, 1960s and even 1970s: People were not generally overweight. Now a lot of people need electric wheel chair shopping carts in the supermarket, and still load up on ice cream, cookies, pie, etc. Something is very wrong.

An improved diet is fundamental to clearing up candidiasis, removing refined sugar, wheat and other simple carbs that feed the fungus, at least initially.

Dr. C. Orian Truss did much of the original research into candida and wrote the first and best book on the subject: "The Missing Diagnosis." He advocating taking Nystatin internally. He said it was very safe, and did not pass beyond the digestive tract, which is the origin of the infection. Newer antifungals are more systemic, but seem to be safe. The catch is whenever you kill a widespread infection, all that dead stuff leaves toxins that might make you feel bad until your body can remove them.

There are a variety of natural food and herb supplements that have a reputation for effectiveness. Coconut oil is the most well-known, and is certainly easy to add to your diet. However, most people don't understand how it works. About half of coconut oil is lauric acid, which is commonly used to make soap (and may be why applying coconut oil to your face after shaving will make your skin burn). When you eat coconut oil, your body combines some of the lauric acid with glycerin to make monolaurin, which is the component that is believed to be a powerful germicide, including fighting viruses and fungi. If you just apply coconut oil externally, you are not getting any monolaurin. You can buy pure monolaurin, but it is expensive. If you add coconut oil to your diet, you mix it with a little glycerin. Glycerin is in the fat of a lot of foods, but your body has to digest it.

Pau D'arco herb has a long-established reputation for being effective against candidiasis. I intend to try some as part of changes to improve my diet and health, post covid.

Tea tree oil is famous, but is for external use, only. It is in Vi-John tube shave cream, which is the most popular shave cream with barbers in India, and for good reason: Staph infections are a big problem in India. Glycerin, which is fairly expensive, is the main active ingredient. It provides an excellent shave. However, if you use shaving soap, you probably should buy a few synthetic brushes and rotate them so they dry out thoroughly.

Of course, you can buy tea tree essential oil. But do some research: essential oils are extremely concentrated and should be used carefully.

The benefits of a low carb, no sugar diet are due to a variety of factors. Aside from helping to starve/clear up candidiasis, eliminating wheat and dairy can reduce stress on your immune system if you have an IgE food allergy to them. This is due to the "rain barrel effect."

As to shaving, I'm not sure I would use a cartridge razor if I had a skin infection. Would it dry out enough between uses to avoid perpetuating and spreading an infection?

I wouldn't use a butterfly razor, either. I'd just use a three-piece DE razor. If I were really worried, I would just use a blade once, and I would have more than one razor, so it dried out thoroughly: dry air and UV light do a lot to kill germs. And I would use a very mild razor.

I dug out my Baili BR171 razor and attempted to shave with it this morning. In theory, it's a great design, clamping the blade tightly. The blade gap is good. But, like many Chinese razors, there just isn't enough blade extension. Experimenting with angles, I could get a shave with it, but it wasn't close. However, obviously, some folks want such a shave. I gave up on it, and returned to my vintage OC razor. But I'm spoiled.

If you have to be very careful about nicks and cuts, the Baili BR171 might be a good DE razor. The Baili BR172 is even milder. Some people love it - I guess people who want a cheap alternative to mild cartridges. I gave mine away years ago. You probably would want a sharp but gentle blade. The Treet King blade might be worth considering. Or just go with the more common Treet 7 Day Platinum blade. I think you might find it smoother and gentler than the P&G Perma-Sharp blade, and about as sharp. The Treet Dura Sharp carbon steel blade has the merit of not having any chrome in the sputtering or stainless steel -- just a coating of PTFE -- so it is probably about as hypoallergenic is they come.

And then, of course, there is the BIC Sensitive single blade disposable razor. If necessary, just use it once. Don't press too hard and you will be fine. Or the BIC Metal, if it's not too aggressive.

Do some research on your own if you can't find a doctor who you have confidence in. There's a lot you can do.

Hope this helps.

FYI: I Interviewed Dr. Truss while working as an editor and researcher at a well-known health book publisher. He was a very modest, cordial man.
I have had a weakened immune system since I had Colorectal cancer. I am also a diabetic. Earlier in the year my Doctor believed I could have Prostate cancer. However, the tests revealed that I now require insulin. I certainly have frequent fungal and staph infections.

I have around 300 razors, so rarely shave with the same razor and blade in subsequent shaves, and I am not a daily shaver.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom