Your first camera

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Mine was an East German Praktica Super TL (from looking at pictures ... something like, anyway). It was my Uncle's and it came with a 50mm prime lens which mine was stuck wide open. I still have the lens, which could be pressed into action with a collar on my Canon EOS.

I used to photograph in B&W, largely because colour film just wasn't all that ...

On those old Eastern Bloc lenses, there's some good stuff out there. After the Iron Curtain came down, the Soviets found themselves with a Karl Zeiss factory on their side. Copied many times and put into cheap as chips lenses which are a lot of fun to use today.

For a long time, I didn't have a (working) camera and didn't embrace digital until quite late on. I had a Fuji E500 for a good long while and took some cracking pictures with it. I was into food photography back then and would often get questions about my kit, to which I stunned inquirers with my answer.
There were some very good cameras from Russia. The Kiev 4 was a particular favourite, and, along with nested matryoshka dolls and Rollei lookalikes, in the 70's it could be bought from the Russian Shop in High Holborn.
 
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@Cristobal

Semiotics? Shit - were you taught by Umerto Eco? ha ha. I.
Funnily enough, at that time I asked him about Eco's novels (Foucault's Pendulum, my favourite book) and he advised me to read it backwards (from the last chapter to the first one); apparently he used to do that with The Lord of the Rings on a regular basis. It's supposed to give you a fresh look on the story, you might notice some new things that make sense, etc. Broadly speaking, he suggested to do that with your favourite books.
 
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Digimonkey

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Funnily enough, at that time I asked him about Eco's novels (Foucault's Pendulum, my favourite book) and he advised me to read it backwards (from the last chapter to the first one); apparently he used to do that with The Lord of the Rings on a regular basis. It's supposed to give you a fresh look on the story, you might noticed some new things that make sense, etc. Broadly speaking, he suggested to that with your favourite books.
Although one of his lighter reads - I really enjoyed Eco's 'The Name of the Rose.' Apart from his amusing habit of hiding important plot pointers in the chapter introductions rendered in medieval Latin. I always got the impression that - no matter where he was - Eco would be the most clever person in the room. Did reading books backwards work for you? I can see the logic. cheers - I.
 
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Although one of his lighter reads - I really enjoyed Eco's 'The Name of the Rose.' Apart from his amusing habit of hiding important plot pointers in the chapter introductions rendered in medieval Latin. I always got the impression that - no matter where he was - Eco would be the most clever person in the room. Did reading books backwards work for you? I can see the logic. cheers - I.
You're right, Eco was a true humanist.

I haven't tried to read backwards yet, but in my opinion it's a very smart way to rediscover a book.

As for The name of the rose, it's the latin precisely that put me off. I did study it in high school though (4 years... Very useful when your mother tongue is a Romance language, even in English incidentally). Anyway when reading the novel, I didn't have the courage to translate dozens of paragraphs...
 
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Oviedo, Spain
Funnily enough, at that time I asked him about Eco's novels (Foucault's Pendulum, my favourite book) and he advised me to read it backwards (from the last chapter to the first one); apparently he used to do that with The Lord of the Rings on a regular basis. It's supposed to give you a fresh look on the story, you might notice some new things that make sense, etc. Broadly speaking, he suggested to that with your favourite books.
And here I thought Foucault's Pendulum was about the mysteries surrounding the invention of Kodak's Brownie Hawkeye. Now, for sure, I have to get my hands on Eco's book.
 
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