What are you reading at the moment?

Digimonkey

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Gettysburg - Pennsylvania - Timothy H. O'Sullivan. 1863

Abraham Lincoln - the Gettysburg address - November the 19th 1863 - in full - exquisite and painful words. Two hundred and seventy one of them.

'Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate - we can not consecrate - we can not hallow - this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us - that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion - that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain - that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom - and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.'


What I was reading again tonight - even 157 years distant - entirely relevant - ding dong - the witch is dead - biggly. It's going to drag out in the courts for months - obviously. The president elect will be the oldest in American history - replacing the second oldest - biggly. Kennedy, Clinton and Obama were in their 40's. A system on the point of atrophy? I seek to make no greater point, or any point at all - for that matter - will we learn? - I doubt it - I.

@Scotshave @Missoni
 
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I'm an absolute softy for this book. Revisiting for the first time in 20 years. I have so many happy memories of being on Ithaka and Kephalonia. I would give anything to be there right now.

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I've just finished this. When it comes to films, horror is one of my favourite genres but not one I usually venture into when I'm choosing a new book.

While the story of this is intriguing, the layout, journal entries from different characters, also tie in well but I didnt find the horror aspect of it good at all. Maybe I was expecting too much from a book.

When it comes to horror in particular...maybe films are just better?
 
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View attachment 61586

I've just finished this. When it comes to films, horror is one of my favourite genres but not one I usually venture into when I'm choosing a new book.

While the story of this is intriguing, the layout, journal entries from different characters, also tie in well but I didnt find the horror aspect of it good at all. Maybe I was expecting too much from a book.

When it comes to horror in particular...maybe films are just better?
It’s definitely not a schlock horror novel, but firmly in the gothic horror genre, it’s a slow burn given the epistolary style, but imho this gives the reader the opportunity to let their imagination run riot, rather than having every scene set out for them. For me this makes the book a more immersive experience rather than having it described in a more cinematic style, which is pretty much an inevitability in modern horror novels, because cinema.
 
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Belfast
It’s definitely not a schlock horror novel, but firmly in the gothic horror genre, it’s a slow burn given the epistolary style, but imho this gives the reader the opportunity to let their imagination run riot, rather than having every scene set out for them. For me this makes the book a more immersive experience rather than having it described in a more cinematic style, which is pretty much an inevitability in modern horror novels, because cinema.
Very well put Rob...slow burn describes it perfectly. By no means a bad read, just not what I expected and certainly wouldn't put me off reading more of that genre in the future.
 
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Edinburgh
View attachment 61586

I've just finished this. When it comes to films, horror is one of my favourite genres but not one I usually venture into when I'm choosing a new book.

While the story of this is intriguing, the layout, journal entries from different characters, also tie in well but I didnt find the horror aspect of it good at all. Maybe I was expecting too much from a book.

When it comes to horror in particular...maybe films are just better?
It’s a fascinating, but uneven, book. Inherently misogynistic, with a slight homoerotic undertone that, to me, Stoker felt he had to overcompensate by the staking of Lucy (the most horrible part in the book). Lucy’s only crime was being slightly flirtatious and flighty.

I’m concerned that we never get to the real Dracula; apart from him talking of his Szekely history. Later on, he is sidelined and viewed through the standpoint of others.

The book can be interpreted many ways: through the lens of Marxism; fear of ‘the other’; contagion; miscegenation and so on.

it does have its plusses: the use of modern media; wax cylinders, stenograph, telegraph, railway timetables, typewriters, Kodaks and so on is interesting. But then you get Van Helsing the Dutchman coming out with ‘Mein Gott!’. Also, D dies by a stab with a khukri knife; no stake etc. Very clumsy. That’s one of my editions you have, incidentally.

As to films being better, it depends what you want from your book.
 
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326
Location
Belfast
It’s a fascinating, but uneven, book. Inherently misogynistic, with a slight homoerotic undertone that, to me, Stoker felt he had to overcompensate by the staking of Lucy (the most horrible part in the book). Lucy’s only crime was being slightly flirtatious and flighty.

I’m concerned that we never get to the real Dracula; apart from him talking of his Szekely history. Later on, he is sidelined and viewed through the standpoint of others.

The book can be interpreted many ways: through the lens of Marxism; fear of ‘the other’; contagion; miscegenation and so on.

it does have its plusses: the use of modern media; wax cylinders, stenograph, telegraph, railway timetables, typewriters, Kodaks and so on is interesting. But then you get Van Helsing the Dutchman coming out with ‘Mein Gott!’. Also, D dies by a stab with a khukri knife; no stake etc. Very clumsy. That’s one of my editions you have, incidentally.

As to films being better, it depends what you want from your book.
:unsure: until I read your reply there it hadn't even crossed my mind about questioning how the Khukri knife was fit for purpose to kill Dracula! No idea why this didnt stand out to me as a blooper if you will.
 
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:unsure: until I read your reply there it hadn't even crossed my mind about questioning how the Khukri knife was fit for purpose to kill Dracula! No idea why this didnt stand out to me as a blooper if you will.
If you want to keep with the Gothic, you could do a lot worse than Sheridan Le Fanu’s story Carmilla; a clear influence on Dracula; and Robert Louis Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. We all know the story via film; but the novella is quite different...
 
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326
Location
Belfast
If you want to keep with the Gothic, you could do a lot worse than Sheridan Le Fanu’s story Carmilla; a clear influence on Dracula; and Robert Louis Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. We all know the story via film; but the novella is quite different...
When I bought Dracula, I got Frankenstein also so its on the book shelf to be read. I must have a look at those other ones you have recommended (y)
 
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