What are you reading at the moment?

Digimonkey

Supporter
Supporter
Messages
1,878
Botd-21-06-20.jpg

This is actually an anti-review - I very seldom do not finish books I have started - whether I particularly am enjoying them or not - I get to the end - sometimes only through bloody-mindedness - but to completion - none the less. This I will not - I'm not going to waste any more of my life on it - according to the Kindle - I am 19% of the way through - enough to know it is not going to get any more engaging. It was recommended to me by a friend whose opinions I take seriously concerning books - the strap line on most copies reads 'what we should know about people we don't know,' - fair enough - interesting premise - it is almost entirely derived from the theories of a psychologist called Timothy Levine - who asserts that in our interaction with people we don't know - we 'default to truth' - humans tend to believe the better of our fellow men until we have overwhelming evidence that the contrary is true - fair enough - engaging as an idea - it might be easy to understand that there would be good evolutionay reasons why this might be the case - but thus far not one of the examples provided by the author to support this deals with a stranger - he might get around around to it later in the book - but I'm not going to find out. If I am wrong - and you have read it to the conclusion - I am happy to have this pointed out to me. Given the fact that Gladwell is a staffer at the 'New Yorker' - I was astonished how crap his writing style is - each to their own - you may want to see what you think yourself - the book won awards apparently. Deeply disappointing for me - having heard great things about it. At least on the Kindle I only wasted five quid - compared to the price of a paper copy. Since we are on the subject - books I refused to finish - classics - 'Moby Dick' by Herman Melville - one of the greatest opening lines ever - 'Call me Ishmael,' - then it descends into the inky depths it so tediously describes thereafter - if only it happened quicker - if the Pequod had gone down like the Titanic - in chapter two - fair enough - it need not have taken nearly six hundred pages of stupefyingly dull and over written text - I am aware that I am swimming against the tide with this book - generally considered a masterpiece of 19th century American literature - the honour of the very, very worst book I never finished - 'American Psycho' by Bret Easton Ellis - if it is a pastiche and satire of the astonishingly vacous times the author describes - he did well. Each to their own - I.

@Missoni @Scotshave
 
Last edited:
Messages
791
View attachment 56025

This is actually an anti-review - I very seldom do not finish books I have started - whether I particularly am enjoying them or not - I get to the end - sometimes only through bloody-mindedness - but to completion - none the less. This I will not - I'm not going to waste any more of my life on it - according to the Kindle - I am 19% of the way through - enough to know it is not going to get any more engaging. It was recommended to me by a friend whose opinions I take seriously concerning books - the strap line on most copies reads 'what we should know about people we don't know,' - fair enough - interesting premise - it is almost entirely derived from the theories of a psychologist called Timothy Levine - who asserts that in our interaction with people we don't know - we 'default to truth' - humans tend to believe the better of our fellow men until we have overwhelming evidence that the contrary is true - fair enough - engaging as an idea - it might be easy to understand that there would be good evolutionay reasons why this might be the case - but thus far not one of the examples provided by the author to support this deals with a stranger - he might get around around to it later in the book - but I'm not going to find out. If I am wrong - and you have read it to the conclusion - I am happy to have this pointed out to me. Given the fact that Gladwell is a staffer at the 'New Yorker' - I was astonished how crap his writing style is - each to their own - you may want to see what you think yourself - the book won awards apparently. Deeply disappointing for me - having heard great things about it. At least on the Kindle I only wasted five quid - compared to the price of a paper copy. Since we are on the subject - books I refused to finish - classics - 'Moby Dick' by Herman Melville - one of the greatest opening lines ever - 'Call me Ishmael,' - then it descends into the inky depths it so tediously describes thereafter - if only it happened quicker - if the Pequod had gone down like the Titanic - in chapter two - fair enough - it need not have taken nearly six hundred pages of stupefyingly dull and over written text - I am aware that I am swimming against the tide with this book - generally considered a masterpiece of 19th century American literature - the honour of the very, very worst book I never finished - 'American Psycho' by Bret Easton Ellis - if it is a pastiche and satire of the astonishingly vacous times the author describes - he did well. Each to their own - I.

@Missoni @Scotshave
I am currently reading Moby Dick at a glacial pace and have to agree that it is hard work; I do admire his use of language but there is no sense of pace. I am determined to finish the book though but at the rate I am reading probably another year or so to go. Anna Karenina is also another book that has little pace for me, except for the horse racing chapter which is just an incredible piece of writing but the rest of the book...er no...
 

Digimonkey

Supporter
Supporter
Messages
1,878
Botd-26-06-20.jpg

'Solipsism' - noun -

'The view that the self is the only reality.'

'Absorption with oneself without consideration for the needs and desires of others'

To extend -

'Epistemological solipsism is the variety of idealism according to which only the directly accessible mental contents of a solipsistic philosopher (?) can be known. The existence of an external world is regarded as an unsolvable question rather than actually false. Further, one cannot also be certain as to what extent the external world exists independently of one's mind. For instance, it may be that a God-like being controls the sensations received by one's brain, making it appear as if there is an external world when most of it (excluding the God-like being and oneself) is false. However, the point remains that epistemological solipsists consider this an "unsolvable" question.'


Fake news - except it is not - unfortunately - I.

@Missoni @Scotshave @Blademonkey
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom