Nib smoothing

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124
Location
Glasgow
Got a nice Kaweco Dia for Xmas, collection of diamine inks delivered yesterday and some Jinhaos are inbound from China. Thanks to all enablers :)

Been reading about micromesh and nib smoothing and in an effort not to buy any more stuff any reason why a gentle swipe on a 12k naniwa hone which already have for SR purposes wouldn't do much the same job? Anyone tried it?
 
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911
Got a nice Kaweco Dia for Xmas, collection of diamine inks delivered yesterday and some Jinhaos are inbound from China. Thanks to all enablers :)

Been reading about micromesh and nib smoothing and in an effort not to buy any more stuff any reason why a gentle swipe on a 12k naniwa hone which already have for SR purposes wouldn't do much the same job? Anyone tried it?
I did try that and I found that you need to spend a hell of a long time scrubbing to get any result. I got better results with 600 grit sandpaper.
 
OP
Mattius
Messages
124
Location
Glasgow
I did try that and I found that you need to spend a hell of a long time scrubbing to get any result. I got better results with 600 grit sandpaper.
That's helpful thanks. Quite a difference between 12k and 600 grit...i was under the impression it was a very gentle job. Will maybe reverse down the hone progression if needed
 
Messages
911
That's helpful thanks. Quite a difference between 12k and 600 grit...i was under the impression it was a very gentle job. Will maybe reverse down the hone progression if needed
Yes, big difference.

I also tried 800 and 1200 but 600 worked ok for me. Just gently, no pressure a bit like shaving lol
 
Messages
6,299
Location
Norfolk, England
I use sheets of micromesh - 2400 grit is OK for gentle poilishing, but, if I want to re-form a nib to remove a tendency towards ink flow problems, I use a progression from 200 grit down to the 2400.
 

jar

Messages
216
Location
Deep South Texas
Please remember that using micromesh or any other similar product should always be the absolute last resort and only done when there are simply no other options available. Adjust first. A good loupe and fingernails are the answer for most nib problems.
 
OP
Mattius
Messages
124
Location
Glasgow
Ok thanks. Being a pen noob I just assumed the answer to being a bit scratchy was take a bit off with something abrasive...
Any tips or stuff to read up on you can suggest?
 

jar

Messages
216
Location
Deep South Texas
Ok thanks. Being a pen noob I just assumed the answer to being a bit scratchy was take a bit off with something abrasive...
Any tips or stuff to read up on you can suggest?
The most common issue is when the tines are not properly aligned. One tine will be higher than the other. The difference does not need to be very much for a user to feel the pen being scratchy when moved in one direction and smooth but skippy in another. In fact, often the difference is so small you cannot see it unaided. That is why the loupe is your friend. I like to have a 10X and a 20X handy. Your goal is to use you fingernails to get both tines aligned smoothly.

The next most common problem is poor flow, too dry or too wet.again, fingers are the best tools. To make a nib wetter you can use your fingernails at the shoulders of the nib to spread the tines slightly or your fingers at the shoulder to slightly close the tines if it is too wet.

The important things are to make small changes and test and make as few changes that cannot be reversed as possible.
 
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