new light tent practice shots

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1,296
@stormcrowuk - Evening mate - it is a very long time since I have done any product/pack shot photography but if it is helpful - and it depends on the design of the light tent - we used to buy sheets of matte art paper in A1 or A0 size depending on what was being photographed. Easy to cut to size. It allows you to choose colours that will complement the product and any flat even background will really help it stand out. A cheap way of getting the 'infinity cove' effect. In the case of what you are photographing - brown or gray shades? You can't go far wrong with white or black - but it might be a bit clinical for what you are showcasing. Fabric shops are good also for cheap ways to have a range of back drops at your disposal - although paper is easier than trying to keep cloth dust free and clean. In my opinion it is best to stick to neutral backgrounds - avoid patterns unless you think there is a good reason for it. It's distracting. You appear to have the lighting nailed already - have you tried polarising the light? I don't know but it might help bring out the grain in the leather. Impressive work - yours - I.
 
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stormcrowuk
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137
Location
Northumberland
@stormcrowuk - Evening mate - it is a very long time since I have done any product/pack shot photography but if it is helpful - and it depends on the design of the light tent - we used to buy sheets of matte art paper in A1 or A0 size depending on what was being photographed. Easy to cut to size. It allows you to choose colours that will complement the product and any flat even background will really help it stand out. A cheap way of getting the 'infinity cove' effect. In the case of what you are photographing - brown or gray shades? You can't go far wrong with white or black - but it might be a bit clinical for what you are showcasing. Fabric shops are good also for cheap ways to have a range of back drops at your disposal - although paper is easier than trying to keep cloth dust free and clean. In my opinion it is best to stick to neutral backgrounds - avoid patterns unless you think there is a good reason for it. It's distracting. You appear to have the lighting nailed already - have you tried polarising the light? I don't know but it might help bring out the grain in the leather. Impressive work - yours - I.
Thanks very much for the info. I'm busy looking into some vinyl wood effect backdrops as I quite like the idea of a rustic feel to the photographs instead of plain backgrounds. I've also bought some quite coarse material like hessian so I'm going to attach some Velcro to that so I can use it in my light tent. I'm thinking for my leather shots a few props (leather tools) may help to emphasis the handmade aspect of the work so I'll give that a try as well. I think there is going to be quite a few experiments in the next week or so till I get something that feels right.
I never thought about using a polariser I think your right that may help to remove some of the glare on the leather I'm definitely going to try that out.
Thanks
 
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