Gillette New Biased Pin & Short Pin ... Why?

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People, it was ALL for legal reasons.


...Then something amazing happens on November 18, 1929. Gaisman files to amend his patent that was awarded back in February 7, 1928. Ostensibly, he needed to change a couple minor details! What he does, without changing any drawings, is rename a few structures, like “holes” become “apertures” and “pins” become “studs”. All this seems innocuous enough. However, he adds 15 paragraphs of additional claims going from 8 claims to 23 claims. In doing so, he lays claim to any stud that is “non-cylindrical” in nature. Thereby he would own any blade design with an aperture or positioning hole that is non-circular. Remember, GSRC's old-type blade has circular type holes. Gaisman does not claim that. But, under the new application diamond shaped holes would be owned by Gaisman. Also, it appears that GSRC's horizontal slot in their blade, to mate with the razor's blocking bar, is now off limits too...
There is the answer.

 
OP
pjgh
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Location
Halifax, Republic of Yorkshire
I think we've lost our way ...

The Gillette/AutoStrop merger was late 1930. Gaisman became GSRC's Chairman.

Roll forward in time to presumably early to mid-1940s and over the pond to Britain. In what would appear to be limited quantities, Gillette produced a minor variant of the twin slot top cap that had short pins which were either symmetrically placed either side of the central post or on a bias, paired with the more regular twin slot flat bottom baseplate. The question is regarding these top caps and their specific purpose when the more regular twin slot would perform the same task and was designed to fit the base plates.

By this point, Gillette blades were the full cutout as per blades we might buy today. Indeed, Gaisman's key patents: 1,633,739 & 1,639,335 were incorporated into the Gillette Blue which was readily available through that period and had been for a good decade. Those patent numbers are on the blade itself. Or, spun the other way around, the Gillette Blue WAS Gaisman's blade, replacing the 'New' blade design. This design has not changed at all since 1934.

Specifically, what then was the purpose of the short pins, either symmetrically placed or on a bias?

I don't think it is about fitting a specfic Gillette blade since Gillette blades now featured the somewhat universal cutout which provided compatibility with a whole range of Gillette and competitors' razors. I don't think it is about fitting the competition's blades (see the period advert on page 2), since the long slot or the twin slot would fit all of those blades as well.
 
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OP
pjgh
Messages
9,626
Location
Halifax, Republic of Yorkshire
I think we have an answer ...

That chap on B&B came back to me by PM and proposed an idea which yes, folks have touched upon ("it's about Glaisman", right?) and we were all certainly pointing in the right direction ... just looking at it from the wrong angle.

Stumped because it would appear to be the most minimal amount of metal required to fit absolutely all of Glaisman's designs, yet GIllette had already standardised on the Gillette Blue style blade which these caps fit without issue.

No, flip it the other way around ...

For competitors, any blade design even slightly resembling the Gillette Blue would infringe on some patent or other, so their designs were often wildly different. Most would be based around a long slot but would often have a much larger aperture in the middle. Some of Gillette's caps would hold these in place, particularly the long slotted New cap.

So, it's not about whether a blade would fit ... but whether it would HOLD.

These caps would appear to be the most minimal amount of metal to hold all of GILLETTE designed blades, but many (hopefully all, presumably) of their competitors blades would fit, but would not be hold perfectly in place ... their blades might slop around or be difficult to centre. With these short and biased pin caps, for the competition, there's always be a either piece of metal in the way or a gap where a retaining post would be required.

Back to the Gillette Blue design ...

That's a blade that yes, might well fit all manner of razors; even the competition. More importantly (to Gillette), it is absolutely backwards compatible with ALL of their razors and as a bonus, contains so many patent components that they make it almost impossible for the competition to design anything close.

So, bottom line ...

It's not about whether a blade might fit, but whether it will hold.
 
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