Gillette New Biased Pin & Short Pin ... Why?

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pjgh
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I had considered that @Boycie83 but it's the tiniest of a thin strip. I gather it's for these reasons that the bakelite razors were made. Look also at the Korean wartime superspeed with the plastic tip. Presumably the GEM Bullet Tip (in plastic) was a similar effort.

Ah, so @TobyC @Bogeyman it might be like Valet razors and how the FEATHER FHS is so cut out it can fit into all variants yet still located and hold in place on the myriad of pin variants: https://www.theshavingroom.co.uk/community/index.php?threads/valet-feather-compatibility.30834/

Due to very slight iterations in the blade cutouts, the short pin and the bias pin are guaranteed to fit absolutely all variants of Glaisman's designs (figures 9-16 in the patent above). I can see above that the long slot (of the US-style New) and the twin pin (of the British New) would not fit a number of those blades above. That said, the blade shown in the second part of that patent, which bears a striking if not identical appearance to the modern DE blade, is a compromise (a universal design) to accept all variants of razor.

I can see the reason for the design now, but I still wonder why given that by the time these razors with the short/bias pins came into production, the New blade had been superceded by this universal blade design ... circa 1933? 1934? The standardised Gillette Blue blade.



Maybe the short pin and bias pin are earlier in design than even the long slot or the twin pin, then? Earlier in design yet not produced until later.

... back to @TobyC's "there is no normal at Gillette". Maybe at the time there was a literal confusion of blades, particularly across markets and at a point where folks were travelling extensively across the world (during those wartime years, Americans, Canadians, Australians, New Zealanders to Europe, North Africa and the Far East; and Europeans), bringing razors and blades, leaving behind blades; these short pin and bias pin models would have been able to accept a much wider variety of blades that might well have been segregated to specific markets otherwise.

I get a general feeling that these short pin and bias pin razors were Service Kit later into the war years.
 
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I had considered that @Boycie83 but it's the tiniest of a thin strip. I gather it's for these reasons that the bakelite razors were made. Look also at the Korean wartime superspeed with the plastic tip. Presumably the GEM Bullet Tip (in plastic) was a similar effort.

Ah, so @TobyC @Bogeyman it might be like Valet razors and how the FEATHER FHS is so cut out it can fit into all variants yet still located and hold in place on the myriad of pin variants: https://www.theshavingroom.co.uk/community/index.php?threads/valet-feather-compatibility.30834/

Due to very slight iterations in the blade cutouts, the short pin and the bias pin are guaranteed to fit absolutely all variants of Glaisman's designs (figures 9-16 in the patent above). I can see above that the long slot (of the US-style New) and the twin pin (of the British New) would not fit a number of those blades above. That said, the blade shown in the second part of that patent, which bears a striking if not identical appearance to the modern DE blade, is a compromise (a universal design) to accept all variants of razor.

I can see the reason for the design now, but I still wonder why given that by the time these razors with the short/bias pins came into production, the New blade had been superceded by this universal blade design ... circa 1933? 1934? The standardised Gillette Blue blade.



Maybe the short pin and bias pin are earlier in design than even the long slot or the twin pin, then? Earlier in design yet not produced until later.

... back to @TobyC's "there is no normal at Gillette". Maybe at the time there was a literal confusion of blades, particularly across markets and at a point where folks were travelling extensively across the world (during those wartime years, Americans, Canadians, Australians, New Zealanders to Europe, North Africa and the Far East; and Europeans), bringing razors and blades, leaving behind blades; these short pin and bias pin models would have been able to accept a much wider variety of blades that might well have been segregated to specific markets otherwise.

I get a general feeling that these short pin and bias pin razors were Service Kit later into the war years.
There's are just as many Techs, if not more, from the war years, and they couldn't use either of those small pin caps. But I know of no other reason for those caps.
 
OP
pjgh
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Were some of you guys shooting pool down at the Billiards Emporium during history class? :rolleyes: These changes were implemented before WWII.

Shit, yes! You're actually right! History class was Friday morning and that clashed with the second hand record stalls down on Dewsbury market.

... er, yes, but the razors themselves are reputed to be 1939-1945. Wartime. Granted, these blades (and their patents) are well before that, right at the beginning of the 1930s so a long time before, but their effects would have been far reaching. How many shapes and styles of blade existed at the beginning of the 1940s? Personally, I would have thought we were all settled on the universal pattern seen on the Gillette Blues.

... which doesn't go anywhere to answering why these razors were produced, unless they were indeed produced WAY earlier than we've guessed and did in fact correspond to the myriad of spoiler designs and rather than a universal blade, here was a universal top cap.

I'll have to wake up my B&B account.
 
OP
pjgh
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Here's an advert from 1940:



... where we can see that Gillette's New whether it be long slot, twin slot, short pin or biased pin, it would fit all these blades.

Granted, the round pin New (with the lateral tabs) produced about the same time would only have fitted Gillette blades (like the Gillette Blue with the universal cutout) and not in any of these blades due to the diamond shape rather than round shape. Buy a GIllette razor, use Gillette blades.

... and so I return to my thoughts about (a) these bias pin/short pin razors being Service Kit; (b) the plethora of blade shapes and styles. Put them together and you have a razor with a top cap that has the most minimal amount of pin to accept the widest choice of blade without the pin size/position tripping up over the razor design.

I've PM'd MacDaddy. Thanks @TobyC
 
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