Fountain Pens and Shaving Instruments

Messages
2,013
Location
Out of off of Chorley
Agreed on the Lamy Safari. Such a great writer, cheap price for an "authentic" pen, and actually easily available on the high street. I've tried to think of it as a simple plastic pen but it performs so well and gets a lot of love.

@Vacumatic Thanks for the pics, very interesting. I might try the Delike style pen, looks fun. If you are thinking of a new razor (I know I shouldn't be sending you down the collection rabbit hole) you might want to look at the Rockwell Razor 6S. It's inexpensive, very weighty stainless steel and comes with 6 baseplate settings. It's my cheapest SS razor but boy does it shave well.
 
Messages
612
If I can give you a little bit of advice, get yourself a Jinhao X450, most have a fine nib as standard, it will cost you less than a Lamy nib, all you will need is a bottle of ink, there is an online seller called The Writing Desk who offers a huge range.

I think you will like the Jinhao as much as the Lamy.
thanks for the advice @Vacumatic. I’ve had a look online I have pulled the trigger on the Jinhao.lets see how it goes.

I’ll look at The Writing Desk too, though it will be a black ink I’m looking for.
 
Messages
1,268
Location
Southern Ontario, Canada
An impressive collection. One of the best known pen experts in the country says that Pelikans are the best modern pen you can buy, I only have a couple, the cafe creme and a 805, the engineering quality is superb.

In terms of brushes I only have one so far and I am in a bit of a dilemna. I love my animals and dont like to think of animals suffering from cruelty. I understand that most badger hair comes from China even for brushes made elsewhere, I have seen cruelty from the chinese in producing other goods from animals, the idea that badgers may be suffering for the sake of my new shaving brush is a problem to me. I would prefer to buy a synthetic brush until I can be convinced that all is good in China.

I appreciate your thoughts.
I too love animals, but haven’t given much thought to how badgers might be treated in China; I take your point though. Another alternative to badger and boar is horse hair, which uses a combination of tail and mane hair gleaned from the grooming of horses and because of this horses are not harmed by the harvesting of their hair. As I said before I have tried to like horse hair brushes, but just can’t. I do use a synthetic when I travel because it dries very quickly, but i’ve yet to find a synthetic that can match a good badger or boar.
 
OP
Vacumatic
Messages
70
Agreed on the Lamy Safari. Such a great writer, cheap price for an "authentic" pen, and actually easily available on the high street. I've tried to think of it as a simple plastic pen but it performs so well and gets a lot of love.

@Vacumatic Thanks for the pics, very interesting. I might try the Delike style pen, looks fun. If you are thinking of a new razor (I know I shouldn't be sending you down the collection rabbit hole) you might want to look at the Rockwell Razor 6S. It's inexpensive, very weighty stainless steel and comes with 6 baseplate settings. It's my cheapest SS razor but boy does it shave well.

Thanks for the tip on the Rockwell, looks good and really good reviews.

If anyone is tempted by a new Lamy a point to bear in mind is the cartridges. It would make much more sense if all the manufactures got together and agreed a universal sized cartridge, but that didnt happeen, Parker cartridges fit just Parkers, older Sheaffers had their own system and Lamy have their own, so you need to stock up or buy a converter and a bottle of ink, which may not be convenient if travelling. Apart from these brands mot others have gone for a standard International size.
 
OP
Vacumatic
Messages
70
Heartily recommend Herbin Perle Noire or Sailor kiwa guro, both excellent blacks, kiwa guro is my favourite.
Good choices. The Sailor ink is described as a Permanent (as opposed to washable) ink I know that some people wash out such inks from their pens after each fill, is this somethiing that you suggest?

The only two brands that I avoid are Noodlers and Diamine. Noodlers inks are very inconsistent and Diamine are cheap but have a tendancy to stain
pens, and plastics, its a pity because they have a huge colour range and are cheap.
 
Messages
58
Having been forced to use a fountain/cartridge pen at school, I too have a love of them but being left handed and writing in the way, pushing rather than pulling, I do there are two issues. One I can’t see what I’ve just written and secondly I tend to drag the heel of my hand over the wet ink! I could try writing right handed -left handed by contorting my hand so I pull instead of push, but in my sixth decade I feel its a little late for that. :ROFLMAO:
 
OP
Vacumatic
Messages
70
Having been forced to use a fountain/cartridge pen at school, I too have a love of them but being left handed and writing in the way, pushing rather than pulling, I do there are two issues. One I can’t see what I’ve just written and secondly I tend to drag the heel of my hand over the wet ink! I could try writing right handed -left handed by contorting my hand so I pull instead of push, but in my sixth decade I feel its a little late for that. :ROFLMAO:

I went into pen shop in Kendal, the owner was in shock. The customer before me had asked to try two pens that she was thinking of buying, she pick up a pen in each hand and wrote at the same time. I have tried to do the same and just find it impossible, especially if I want to read what I have written. Not sure if its more impressive or not but what she wrote with each hand was different.

Left handed use with a fountain pen is not easy, Obama is a left hand overwriter, his wrist looks contorted as he writes. i have also seen a writer trun the page through 90 degrees and, effectively writes sideways up the lines. This is actually a bit easier than it sounds.

The only thing I can suggest for left handers is to use a fine nib with a quick drying ink such as Parker but it may be that if I were in your shoes I think I would settle for a mechanical pencil or a good ballpoint.
 
Messages
3,420
Location
Cumbria, England
Good choices. The Sailor ink is described as a Permanent (as opposed to washable) ink I know that some people wash out such inks from their pens after each fill, is this somethiing that you suggest?

The only two brands that I avoid are Noodlers and Diamine. Noodlers inks are very inconsistent and Diamine are cheap but have a tendancy to stain
pens, and plastics, its a pity because they have a huge colour range and are cheap.
The Sailor ink uses carbon nano-particles rather than dye, as such it's a pigment ink which is what gives it its permanence. As long as you don't let it dry in the pen it's fine, I use it a lot of the time and have just refilled when I've been getting low on ink without washing the pen out, and have done this three or four times before cleaning with no ill effects. I would definitely wash out the pen if I wasn't going to use it for a while though. I've found that kiwi guro washes out easily, and for me the minor extra care required is more than worth it for the performance and the sheen on the paper. It's simultaneously the blackest black ever as it's carbon, and one of the less blacks because of the sheen, it almost looks like extremely black pencil on the page. Love the stuff.

Perle Noire is a very easy to live with ink and is definitely one of the blacker blacks. It even has surprising water-resistance for a standard ink. If it wasn't for kiwa guru it would be my go-to black. I only wish Herbin bottles were a more practical shape.

I've had a few Diamine inks and had success with them, but 99% of the time I use either black or blue-black ink. I also enjoy Baystate Blue but that one does need special attention as it stains everything. I've dedicated a pen to it.

I went into pen shop in Kendal, the owner was in shock. The customer before me had asked to try two pens that she was thinking of buying, she pick up a pen in each hand and wrote at the same time. I have tried to do the same and just find it impossible, especially if I want to read what I have written. Not sure if its more impressive or not but what she wrote with each hand was different.

Left handed use with a fountain pen is not easy, Obama is a left hand overwriter, his wrist looks contorted as he writes. i have also seen a writer trun the page through 90 degrees and, effectively writes sideways up the lines. This is actually a bit easier than it sounds.

The only thing I can suggest for left handers is to use a fine nib with a quick drying ink such as Parker but it may be that if I were in your shoes I think I would settle for a mechanical pencil or a good ballpoint.
Writing with both hands is impressive, doing so simultaneously while writing different text is on another level!

I'm a left-handed overwriter, but have managed to arrange my hand and the page to minimise the hooking of my hand as I write. It still looks awkward and it would be easier if I was an underwriter, but if it's good enough for Barack Obama it's good enough for me. I actually find writing with a fountain pen easier than a ballpoint as a fountain pen will write with no pressure, whereas with a ballpoint I need to press on and because I'm pushing rather than pulling the ball can stick and cause skipping, I also find ballpoints tiring for the same reason. I sometimes wish that I'd been taught to write from under the line when I was starting out. I do like the Pentel Energel pens if I have to use a ballpoint but the majority of the time it's a fountain pen.
 
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