Fountain Pens and Shaving Instruments

Messages
70
I am new to the Forum so apologies if the connection between fountain pen use and DE shaving has been discussed before.

I have used fountain pens for many years, I repair them, collect them and just enjoy them, the whole thing of choosing the inks and the journals or paper that goes with using pens, especially for me, older pens. You can see how the pen and shaving worlds have a connection. I can see already that they are both rabbit holes in terms of spending money, especially as you climb the learning curve in knowing how to do things better.

Most of you will get asked how to get started in DE shaving, people want to try it out without spending hundreds on getting the best recommended kit, the same thing goes for using pens - the collecting part comes later.

For those that have never used a fountain pen or want to go back to some childhood memories I suggest that they look at Chinese pens, the Jinhao brand in particular, who make models called X450, X750 and 159. These cost about the same as a cup of coffee, less than £4 delivered, they are well made and reliable and will last a lifetime, easily available on eBay.

Despite having Montblancs and other good pens my daily pen is a retro looking brass pen, costs less than £5 and is bullet proof. I really enjoy it.

Brass pen.jpg
 
Messages
1,766
Location
Silly Suffolk
A fellow-sufferer! I too collect fountain pens, both old and new, from Bexley to Yongshen, via Diplomat, Mentmore, Mabie Todd, Parker (including Vacumatic), Waterman, Pelikan, Pilot, Platinum, Montblanc etc.-the usual suspects. I like them for the same reasons as you, plus I was taught cursive writing at school six decades ago. I always carry and write with a fountain pen, and the only other writing instruments I use occasionally are pencils.

The Chinese pens you mention are indeed very good value, and, at the risk of poking the ants' nest, I think, for the most part, I'd rather have a Chinese pen than a Chinese "hommage" razor; although most "normal" people would probably want one or the other, rather than both.

At the moment, my "Shaving Requisites" accumulation is slightly greater than that of pens, but both number in scores. As you rightly observe, there seems to be some sort of symbiosis between pens and razors, so they either like cohabiting or they're huddling together for mutual reassurance.
 
Messages
2,016
Location
Out of off of Chorley
@Vacumatic What is that brass pen you've shown your post? It looks unusual and interesting. Why is it one of your favourites?

There are a lot of similarities in using safety razors and fountain pens. Both hobbies require a slow down from today's hectic lifestyle to achieve an end result that you can be proud of. Both are great ways to focus on one thing and do it carefully and forget about the rest of the world for a while.
Plus each gives the ability to not be tied into a particular brand or ink colour etc and try a little experimenting.

It'd be nice to see a few pictures of your favourite razors and pens.

I try to use fountain pens in my daily life but have recently been enjoying a few roller-ball pens which can take fountain pen in cartridges. Very smooth to use and lots of fun. I like to try a variety of pens and razors and mix it up a little.
 
OP
Vacumatic
Messages
70
Hi fancontroller

The pen has no makers name, it is similar to another Chinese brand called Delike, if you search for a the name Iraurita it may pick it up, I can provide ebay links but I know that some fora forbid showing ebay links to products. I like the pen because it is a heavyweight despite its small size, it is all brass, with the only piece of plastic being the feed, and it works very well, feels solid in the hand. You can see where the razor comparison comes from.


I agree your point in slowing down, taking stock and thinking about what you are saying and doing, it is also not a bad example to the children around us, taking pleasure from improving their handwriting and enjoying the task in hand.

Its a little early to be showing some pics of razors, it is only in the past week that I have decided to go back to DE shaving, I only have a Wilkinson and a Gillette tech from the 1960s so far.

Here are some favourite pics of pens from my collection, my favourite pen making period is 1930-1939, not sure that any huge improvements have been made since that time.

P1000750.JPGP1000757.JPG








P1000765.JPGP1000795.JPGP1000954.JPG
 
Messages
3,430
Location
Cumbria, England
@Vacumatic What is that brass pen you've shown your post? It looks unusual and interesting.
It looks to be, ahem, “inspired by” the Kaweco Sport.

I have a few higher-end pens myself but one of my favourites, and the pen I use most, is my charcoal Lamy Safari. It’s a solid dependable work horse, feels good in the hand and writes very nicely. Easy to swap nibs too should one get damaged or you want a different size.
 
Messages
1,273
Location
Southern Ontario, Canada
I too collect fountain pens both modern and vintage. Currently I have over 100 all in working condition including my oldest pen which is over 100 years old. My collection includes Conway Stewart, Pelikan, Mabie Todd, Parker, Waterman, Esterbrook, Bexley, Onoto, Sheaffer’s, Wahl Eversharp, Lamy and Conklin. My favourite are my 6 vintage and modern Pelikans. These days I only write with my pens having buggered up several whilst trying to repair or adjust them. In the world of wet shaving my collecting passion is brushes. I own 30 at the moment the majority of which are badger, but I do have several boars and synthetics; I tried horse, but couldn’t connect with it.
 
OP
Vacumatic
Messages
70
It looks to be, ahem, “inspired by” the Kaweco Sport.

I have a few higher-end pens myself but one of my favourites, and the pen I use most, is my charcoal Lamy Safari. It’s a solid dependable work horse, feels good in the hand and writes very nicely. Easy to swap nibs too should one get damaged or you want a different size.

Absolutely right, I have had a couple of Kawecos and didnt get on with them at all, poor ink flow mainly. I would say that the little brass pen is possibly better made than the Kaweco.

I like Lamy pens, low priced and well made, cant be bad. As you say, little piece on sellotape on top of the nib, slide it out all ready for something different.
 
Messages
612
I dipped my toe into the world of fountain pens a few months ago and bought a charcoal Lamy Safari. It was a spur of the moment thing and I only purchased it on recommendations online.

I haven’t looked back since and have found myself sitting up late writing.....just because I can!

I’ll probably look at a fine nib soon as I’m quite a heavy writer, though that’s something I’m looking to change.

Great to see forum members I can ask for advice!
 
OP
Vacumatic
Messages
70
I too collect fountain pens both modern and vintage. Currently I have over 100 all in working condition including my oldest pen which is over 100 years old. My collection includes Conway Stewart, Pelikan, Mabie Todd, Parker, Waterman, Esterbrook, Bexley, Onoto, Sheaffer’s, Wahl Eversharp, Lamy and Conklin. My favourite are my 6 vintage and modern Pelikans. These days I only write with my pens having buggered up several whilst trying to repair or adjust them. In the world of wet shaving my collecting passion is brushes. I own 30 at the moment the majority of which are badger, but I do have several boars and synthetics; I tried horse, but couldn’t connect with it.
An impressive collection. One of the best known pen experts in the country says that Pelikans are the best modern pen you can buy, I only have a couple, the cafe creme and a 805, the engineering quality is superb.

In terms of brushes I only have one so far and I am in a bit of a dilemna. I love my animals and dont like to think of animals suffering from cruelty. I understand that most badger hair comes from China even for brushes made elsewhere, I have seen cruelty from the chinese in producing other goods from animals, the idea that badgers may be suffering for the sake of my new shaving brush is a problem to me. I would prefer to buy a synthetic brush until I can be convinced that all is good in China.

I appreciate your thoughts.
 
OP
Vacumatic
Messages
70
I dipped my toe into the world of fountain pens a few months ago and bought a charcoal Lamy Safari. It was a spur of the moment thing and I only purchased it on recommendations online.

I haven’t looked back since and have found myself sitting up late writing.....just because I can!

I’ll probably look at a fine nib soon as I’m quite a heavy writer, though that’s something I’m looking to change.

Great to see forum members I can ask for advice!
If I can give you a little bit of advice, get yourself a Jinhao X450, most have a fine nib as standard, it will cost you less than a Lamy nib, all you will need is a bottle of ink, there is an online seller called The Writing Desk who offers a huge range.

I think you will like the Jinhao as much as the Lamy.
 
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