Boar Brush Break in QUICK!

Messages
129
Location
Manchester
I still don't see why a new brush needs a breaking in process ? - sure they will get a little softer with use, i get that - but are they so awfull and rough to start with that its necessary to go through some convoluted break-in process ?
 
Messages
2,602
Location
Devon
I still don't see why a new brush needs a breaking in process ? - sure they will get a little softer with use, i get that - but are they so awfull and rough to start with that its necessary to go through some convoluted break-in process ?
Boar brushes need to be broken in. Their performance relies on the tips splitting which ultimately improves softness and lather retention (which they're initially poor at). Why bother you ask? Think of a time before good synthetics, they offered excellent performance for the fraction the cost of a badger. I still enjoy my boar brushes - particularly with creams.
 
Messages
94
Boar brushes need to be broken in. Their performance relies on the tips splitting which ultimately improves softness and lather retention (which they're initially poor at). Why bother you ask? Think of a time before good synthetics, they offered excellent performance for the fraction the cost of a badger. I still enjoy my boar brushes - particularly with creams.
Does that mean they are redundant in the age of synthetics? Or do they offer something extra that no synthetic can match?

I'm not trying to be pedantic, I'm just curious for opinions given that I'm an avowed synth user and have never tried a boar bristle brush (but might consider it if it gave me a new experience I couldn't get elsewhere).
 
Messages
2,602
Location
Devon
Does that mean they are redundant in the age of synthetics? Or do they offer something extra that no synthetic can match?

I'm not trying to be pedantic, I'm just curious for opinions given that I'm an avowed synth user and have never tried a boar bristle brush (but might consider it if it gave me a new experience I couldn't get elsewhere).
It will give you a new experience. That's the fun of them. They have their own unique feel and 'temperament'. Arguably all animal hair brushes are redundant in the age of good synthetics (different argument for a different thread) but a broken in boar is a joy to use. I wouldn't say they're better than any of my other brushes but they bring some nice variation. I can feel the thicker hairs on my face. A good boar brush can be had for less than £15 delivered as well.

I personally won't buy anymore animal hair brushes now but will continue to enjoy the ones I own until they reach the end of their useful life.
 
Messages
1,272
Location
Cat-Pig Swamp
I still don't see why a new brush needs a breaking in process ? - sure they will get a little softer with use, i get that - but are they so awfull and rough to start with that its necessary to go through some convoluted break-in process ?
There are girly men amongst us who have very tender skin that may be severely damaged if something courser than a dandelion comes in contact with them. New brushes make them cry and run for mommy. So, they make every effort to completely crush anything that might be considered "backbone" in a new brush. Then they praise the poor frazzled stump as being the softest most amazing brush they have ever owned.
 
Messages
1,272
Location
Cat-Pig Swamp
Does that mean they are redundant in the age of synthetics? Or do they offer something extra that no synthetic can match?

I'm not trying to be pedantic, I'm just curious for opinions given that I'm an avowed synth user and have never tried a boar bristle brush (but might consider it if it gave me a new experience I couldn't get elsewhere).
I started with synthetic, went to horse, then to badger, then back to synthetic, then I found boar brushes, it was a skateboard to Ferrari kind of enlightenment, never going back.
 
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