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What are you reading at the moment?

Discussion in 'Books' started by Boab, Tuesday July 5, 2011.

  1. Thank's for that. I will certainly root out my copy of Last Exit at the weekend. The trouble is, so many books so little time.
     
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  2. I have had a bit of a Maigret binge since Christmas. Iain (@Digimonkey) and I recently discussed how important books are in our life’s, and I tend to reach for certain types of books according to my frame of mind. I first picked up a Maigret novel in the mid 80’s when I was stressed out over an impending deadline for an essay at uni. I always tended to leave essays to the very last minute and the more panicked I became the more likely I was to dive in to some fiction. Maigret was perfect for this form of escapism. Over the years I have probably read around 30 of the Maigret series. I was gifted a couple I hadn’t read for Christmas and was thrilled to be reacquainted with the Inspector. So much so that I decided to go right back to the beginning of the series and start all over again. There are over 70 in total. I genuinely believe that Simenon was one of the great writers of the 20th century. Deceptively simple little stories which somehow illuminate the human condition. And Maigret is my hero! So I’m going to allow myself one more adventure with the Inspector before I get back to what I’m hiding from - ‘Lanark’. Iain sent me a copy of Alasdair Gray’s novel before Christmas and it sits on my bedside table glaring at me every night.
     
  3. I'm nearly finished with A Conjuring of Light by V. E. Schwab. Last in a trilogy, and one of the best fantasy series around. Really gives the characters depth and the action scenes are fascinating. It always keeps you on the edge of your seat. A solid and satisfying ending to the 3 books.
     
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  4. nolisco

    nolisco

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    Been on a novella binge so far this month, about to start Bullfight by Yashushi Inoue, another short read at 127 pages.

    Aside from that I have Rome: A History in Seven Sackings by Matthew Kneale and Fire and Fury by Michael Wolff on the go. I must say the latter is well over-hyped and nothing new or noteworthy, and with little sources to back anything up.

    Once I finish (and/or abort F&F) them I fancy having a re-read of One Hundred Years of Solitude, it's been about 4 or 5 years since I last visited Macondo and I'm looking forward to it.
     
  5. Scotshave

    Scotshave

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    E9C127A1-D812-4CDB-928B-B0BD2730A2D1.jpeg

    I want to read the whole of The Sea of Fertility but, from what I’ve gathered, this is the strongest of the collection. I love his writing.
     
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  6. Scotshave

    Scotshave

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  7. nolisco

    nolisco

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    I have the collection sat on a book shelf, how is it so far? One of those I have been putting off.
     
  8. Scotshave

    Scotshave

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    I’ve just started it. It’s the second in the series and it seems to chime with Mishima’s Samurai genealogy and what he saw as the tension between imperial Japan and modernity. I see parallels between the characterisation and his final days. Engaging, so far.
     
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  9. I’m about half way through ‘At Day’s Close’ by Roger Ekirich (yet another kind gift from Iain @Digimonkey). ‘A fascinating and colourful social history of the nighttime in the pre-Industrial era‘ as the books blurb has it. This really is an enjoyable read. In fact, for the last couple of nights it has kept me awake when I should be getting my rest. I’m sure you all know the feeling...’just one more chapter’. It’s difficult for us to imagine just how dark it was at nighttime before gas and electricity. Even in the towns and cities. It was bloody dangerous out there! Recommend.
     
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  10. nolisco

    nolisco

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    I gave up on Fire and Fury, I'm not one to give up on a book but I will make an exception for that gossip, better suited to columns in a questionable tabloid.

    Having a rare venture into poetry with The Narrow Road To The Deep North and Other Stories by the Japanese master poet Matsuo Bashō. Very interesting how it combines hiaku and prose. Hiaku is fairly new to me, beyond a few lessons when I was in school but I am enjoying it.

    I still have my Rome book mentioned above to finish. So far getting some good reading done this year! Stuck to my new habit of reading each evening whether it be a little or a lot.
     
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  11. Digimonkey

    Digimonkey

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    Interesting - I toyed with the idea of reading it but thankfully my sister did first and said pretty much what you did. It's hardly Pilger or Woodward and Bernstein. Not proper journalism - low brow gossip. I wonder though whether that the book's subject has so successfully redefined the intellectual landscape - ironic - that this work is an apparently credible response? Who knows. I shan't be concerning myself with it. If you fancy some brave, credible and fearless journalism - try - the shamefully little known - Ukrainian reporter Anna Politskovskaya - 'A Dirty War - a Russian Reporter in Chechnya.' - 2001. She paid the ultimate price being murdered in 2006 leaving her home in Moscow. In my opinion - if Putin didn't commission the killing he certainly gave it the nod - the other name in the frame is Ramzan Kadyrov - who ultimately went on to be the Russian supported leader of Chechnya. She died on Putin's birthday. Yours - I.

    @Barry Giddens
     
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  12. I just ordered 'Origin' by Dan Brown--- anyone read it? I really loved his older books, so feel like I'll dig this too :D
     
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  13. nolisco

    nolisco

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    I read it, thoroughly enjoyed it. Very typical of his other books. Which is your favourite?
     
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  14. Oh nice, good to hear. I feel like I want to get the audiobook... They always make nice stories for long journeys on planes or trains. I've only read his Robert Langdon books, but I think my order of fav would be:

    1. Angels & Demons
    2. Inferno
    3. The Da Vinci Code
    4. The Lost Symbol
     
  15. nolisco

    nolisco

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    Exactly the same order as I would have it minus Origin. I do need to re-read The Da Vanci Code and The Lost Symbol to refresh my memory of them. I would put Origin at number 3. I would be interested to know your thoughts of it.
     
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  16. nolisco

    nolisco

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    Busy week this week, I bought a few books called Pocket Museum, basically picture books with 200 artefacts from three civilizations (Ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome). They are books to revisit and thumb through as opposed to read and be done with. Very inspiring and impressive how skilled the Ancients were, one that sticks out to me is The Boxer of Quirinal. The handy bit was that it lists where the statues or bowls are housed, so you know where to visit if you want to see them in person.
     
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  17. Glen_Lee

    Glen_Lee

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